Photo of the Week – Jorōgumo

<p><i>Nephila clavata</i>, Nephilidae<br />
Mount Ogusu, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
October 22, 2016</p>

Jorō Spider - ♀

Nephila clavata, Nephilidae
Mount Ogusu, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken, Japan
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
October 22, 2016

Sneaking in for the end of #aractober we have this photo of a female Jorō Spider. This is by far the most prominent spider I’ve encountered in Japan, only narrowly avoiding their webs on several occasions. This spider features prominently in the folklore of Japan, inspiring the legend of the Jorōgumo, a shapeshifting spider that would lure male victim by taking the form of a beautiful woman.

<p>Brunswick Point, Delta, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
August 7, 2016</p>

Flying V

Brunswick Point, Delta, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
August 7, 2016

Just like the underdogs in district 5, when these geese were challenged by a tough opponent (raptor flyby), they banded together to cut air resistance for the entire group.

Photo of the Week – Sassy Pose

<p><i>Molothrus ater</i>, Icteridae<br />
Burnaby Lake Park, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 26, 2016</p>

Brown-headed Cowbird - ♂

Molothrus ater, Icteridae
Burnaby Lake Park, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 26, 2016

I really like the detail in this Cowbird portrait shot. You can even see the small individual rimal feathers surrounding the eye.

Photo of the Week – Pop of Color

<p><i>Calochortus macrocarpus</i>, Liliaceae<br />
Nighthawk Road, Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 21, 2016</p>

Sagebrush Mariposa Lily

Calochortus macrocarpus, Liliaceae
Nighthawk Road, Okanagan-Similkameen, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 21, 2016

Went on a successful hunt for a Sage Thrasher on Nighthawk Road and the roadsides were full of these striking purple flowers. Because of their thin grass like leaves these lilies seems to come from nowhere.

Photo of the Week – Like a Wagon Wheel

<p><i>Cortodera subpilosa</i>, Cerambycidae<br />
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
June 21, 2016</p>

Flower Longhorn

Cortodera subpilosa, Cerambycidae
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
June 21, 2016

Recently, Sara and I headed down south to the land of the pines. While we were staring down the road, we picked out this bouquet of flowers, which led us to this momma of a flower longhorn.

Thanks to Bruce Tilden for the ID!

<p><i>Ipomopsis aggregata</i>, Polemoniaceae<br />
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
June 21, 2016</p>

Scarlet Gilia

Ipomopsis aggregata, Polemoniaceae
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
June 21, 2016

This species is also known as Skyrocket due to the trumpet shape with back curved petal lobes. It really was a highlight of the afternoon when we came across it blooming on a recent trip to the interior.

<p><i>Corythucha</i> sp., Tingidae<br />
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 22, 2016</p>

Lace Bug

Corythucha sp., Tingidae
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 22, 2016

This photo gives an unusual angle on a Lace Bug, focusing on their more buggy underside (rather than the lacey wings) and making obvious their phylogenetic relationship with bed bugs.

Photo of the Week – Still Ducks Run Deep

<p><i>Oxyura jamaicensis</i>, Anatidae<br />
Oregon Zoo, Portland, Oregon, United States<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
July 11, 2015</p>

Ruddy Duck - ♂

Oxyura jamaicensis, Anatidae
Oregon Zoo, Portland, Oregon, United States
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
July 11, 2015

I really like the contrast in this shot between the air and the water. The parts of the duck below the water look darker, bigger and slightly misaligned with the parts above the water. All of these differences can be explained by the bending of light as it transitions from water to air (a.k.a. refraction).

Photo of the Week – Ode to Food

<p><i>Erythemis collocata</i>, Libellulidae<br />
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 13, 2015</p>

Western Pondhawk -♀

Erythemis collocata, Libellulidae
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 13, 2015

This week’s photo shows you that in the insect world, not even aerial predators are safe from other aerial predators. Watch your sixes!

Photo of the Week – Curvy & Countable

<p><i>Cygnus olor</i>, Anatidae<br />
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 5, 2016</p>

Mute Swan

Cygnus olor, Anatidae
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 5, 2016

Unlike the Mute Swans of Stanley Park, which have had their wings clipped, the resident mute swans are truly feral and hence countable in a bird watching sense. This swan was being exceptionally cooperative swimming right up to the dike near the viewing tower whereas they are usually sighted far away at the southeastern end of Katzie Marsh.