Photo of the Week – Ode to Food

<p><i>Erythemis collocata</i>, Libellulidae<br />
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 13, 2015</p>

Western Pondhawk -♀

Erythemis collocata, Libellulidae
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 13, 2015

This week’s photo shows you that in the insect world, not even aerial predators are safe from other aerial predators. Watch your sixes!

Photo of the Week – Curvy & Countable

<p><i>Cygnus olor</i>, Anatidae<br />
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 5, 2016</p>

Mute Swan

Cygnus olor, Anatidae
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 5, 2016

Unlike the Mute Swans of Stanley Park, which have had their wings clipped, the resident mute swans are truly feral and hence countable in a bird watching sense. This swan was being exceptionally cooperative swimming right up to the dike near the viewing tower whereas they are usually sighted far away at the southeastern end of Katzie Marsh.

<p><i>Rhagio</i> sp., Rhagionidae<br />
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 21, 2016</p>

Snipe Fly - ♀

Rhagio sp., Rhagionidae
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 21, 2016

I found this striking lady while wondering around our campsite on Harrison Lake this past May long weekend. Despite the loud music and let’s say “eccentric” fellow campers, the area was beautiful and full of nature.

Photo of the Week – Gus & Ollie

<p><i>Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus</i>, Psittacidae<br />
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 15, 2016</p>

Hyacinth Macaw

Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, Psittacidae
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 15, 2016

Sara and I visited the aquarium a few weeks back along with her parents. As a change of pace I decided to bring my telephoto rather than my fast prime. While I wasn’t able to get any really good shots inside because of the low light, I was able to get some satisfying close ups (like the one above) on the marine mammals outside and the birds in the Amazon Gallery. I have a full set of photos from the aquarium over at flickr.

Photo of the Week – Eyeball Love

<p><i>Rhionaeschna multicolor</i>, Aeshnidae<br />
Maplewood Conservation Area, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 7, 2016</p>

Blue-eyed Darner

Rhionaeschna multicolor, Aeshnidae
Maplewood Conservation Area, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 7, 2016

This week we have yet another pair of mating dragonflies. The male is above grasping the female just behind her eyes with his claspers. The female is below curling her abdomen up to the base of the male’s thorax where his secondary genitalia are located.

Photo of the Week – Stalker on the Sand

<p><i>Cicindela oregona oregona</i>, Carabidae<br />
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 1, 2016</p>

Western Tiger Beetle

Cicindela oregona oregona, Carabidae
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 1, 2016

Here we have a shot of our locally common Tiger Beetle. Tiger beetles are an awesome subfamily of Carabids adapted to run down prey across stretches of unvegetated ground. They are actually able to run so fast relative to their body size that they have to use a stop and go running style to allow them to accurately track their prey. The post title is a reference to the great book Tiger Beetles of Alberta by John Acorn.

New Design for My Photo Galleries


After a bunch fiddling with plugin settings and CSS, I’m ready to unveil my new justified design for my photo galleries. Before you give me too much credit, the actual layout is all generated by the Flickr Justified Gallery plugin. I’m really happy with these new galleries look and how they make efficient use of the available space. [click to continue…]

<p><i>Anax junius</i>, Aeshnidae<br />
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 31, 2015</p>

Immature Common Green Darner

Anax junius, Aeshnidae
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 31, 2015

Unlike most of the dragonfly fauna of BC which stay put all year round, Green Darners are migratory. Like Monarchs, adults migrate north in the spring and it is their offspring, who emerge in late summer, that migrate back south. You can help conserve migratory dragonflies by report sightings to the Migratory Dragonfly Partnership.

Photo of the Week – Not So Spotted Jelly

<p><i>Mastigias papua</i>, Mastigiidae<br />
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 35 mm f/1.8<br />
May 30, 2015</p>

Spotted Jelly

Mastigias papua, Mastigiidae
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 35 mm f/1.8
May 30, 2015

This week’s photo features some not so spotty Jellies from the Vancouver aquarium. I really like the creamy bokeh in this shot.

Photo of the Week – Floral Naughty Bits

<p><i>Tragopogon dubius</i>, Asteraceae<br />
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 23, 2015</p>

Western Goat's Beard

Tragopogon dubius, Asteraceae
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 23, 2015

Like Dandelion with which is sometimes confused, Western Goat’s Beard is another member of the daisy family (Asteraceae). It can be easily distinguished from Dandelion by it’s longer involucre bracts (leafy bits just below the flowers) which extend beyond the flowers. Both species lack the central disk flowers of their more daisy like relatives and their flowering heads consist only of ray flowers. I really like this shot because you can clearly see the bilobed stigma (♀ bits) and fused anther cylinders (♂ bits) that are characteristic of the Asteraceae.