Photo of the Week – Like a Wagon Wheel

<p><i>Cortodera subpilosa</i>, Cerambycidae<br />
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
June 21, 2016</p>

Flower Longhorn

Cortodera subpilosa, Cerambycidae
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
June 21, 2016

Recently, Sara and I headed down south to the land of the pines. While we were staring down the road, we picked out this bouquet of flowers, which led us to this momma of a flower longhorn.

Thanks to Bruce Tilden for the ID!

<p><i>Ipomopsis aggregata</i>, Polemoniaceae<br />
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
June 21, 2016</p>

Scarlet Gilia

Ipomopsis aggregata, Polemoniaceae
Wagonwheel Road, Kootenay Boundary, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
June 21, 2016

This species is also known as Skyrocket due to the trumpet shape with back curved petal lobes. It really was a highlight of the afternoon when we came across it blooming on a recent trip to the interior.

<p><i>Corythucha</i> sp., Tingidae<br />
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 22, 2016</p>

Lace Bug

Corythucha sp., Tingidae
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 22, 2016

This photo gives an unusual angle on a Lace Bug, focusing on their more buggy underside (rather than the lacey wings) and making obvious their phylogenetic relationship with bed bugs.

Photo of the Week – Still Ducks Run Deep

<p><i>Oxyura jamaicensis</i>, Anatidae<br />
Oregon Zoo, Portland, Oregon, United States<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
July 11, 2015</p>

Ruddy Duck - ♂

Oxyura jamaicensis, Anatidae
Oregon Zoo, Portland, Oregon, United States
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
July 11, 2015

I really like the contrast in this shot between the air and the water. The parts of the duck below the water look darker, bigger and slightly misaligned with the parts above the water. All of these differences can be explained by the bending of light as it transitions from water to air (a.k.a. refraction).

Photo of the Week – Ode to Food

<p><i>Erythemis collocata</i>, Libellulidae<br />
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 13, 2015</p>

Western Pondhawk -♀

Erythemis collocata, Libellulidae
Minnekhada Regional Park, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 13, 2015

This week’s photo shows you that in the insect world, not even aerial predators are safe from other aerial predators. Watch your sixes!

Photo of the Week – Curvy & Countable

<p><i>Cygnus olor</i>, Anatidae<br />
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
June 5, 2016</p>

Mute Swan

Cygnus olor, Anatidae
Grant Narrows, Pitt Meadows, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
June 5, 2016

Unlike the Mute Swans of Stanley Park, which have had their wings clipped, the resident mute swans are truly feral and hence countable in a bird watching sense. This swan was being exceptionally cooperative swimming right up to the dike near the viewing tower whereas they are usually sighted far away at the southeastern end of Katzie Marsh.

<p><i>Rhagio</i> sp., Rhagionidae<br />
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 21, 2016</p>

Snipe Fly - ♀

Rhagio sp., Rhagionidae
Cogburn Beach, Harrison Lake, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 21, 2016

I found this striking lady while wondering around our campsite on Harrison Lake this past May long weekend. Despite the loud music and let’s say “eccentric” fellow campers, the area was beautiful and full of nature.

Photo of the Week – Gus & Ollie

<p><i>Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus</i>, Psittacidae<br />
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 15, 2016</p>

Hyacinth Macaw

Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus, Psittacidae
Vancouver Aquarium, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 15, 2016

Sara and I visited the aquarium a few weeks back along with her parents. As a change of pace I decided to bring my telephoto rather than my fast prime. While I wasn’t able to get any really good shots inside because of the low light, I was able to get some satisfying close ups (like the one above) on the marine mammals outside and the birds in the Amazon Gallery. I have a full set of photos from the aquarium over at flickr.

Photo of the Week – Eyeball Love

<p><i>Rhionaeschna multicolor</i>, Aeshnidae<br />
Maplewood Conservation Area, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6<br />
May 7, 2016</p>

Blue-eyed Darner

Rhionaeschna multicolor, Aeshnidae
Maplewood Conservation Area, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 70-300 mm f/4.5-5.6
May 7, 2016

This week we have yet another pair of mating dragonflies. The male is above grasping the female just behind her eyes with his claspers. The female is below curling her abdomen up to the base of the male’s thorax where his secondary genitalia are located.

Photo of the Week – Stalker on the Sand

<p><i>Cicindela oregona oregona</i>, Carabidae<br />
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada<br />
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8<br />
May 1, 2016</p>

Western Tiger Beetle

Cicindela oregona oregona, Carabidae
Iona Beach Regional Park, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada
Nikon D5100, 105 mm f/2.8
May 1, 2016

Here we have a shot of our locally common Tiger Beetle. Tiger beetles are an awesome subfamily of Carabids adapted to run down prey across stretches of unvegetated ground. They are actually able to run so fast relative to their body size that they have to use a stop and go running style to allow them to accurately track their prey. The post title is a reference to the great book Tiger Beetles of Alberta by John Acorn.